Amarilla by Frederic Leighton
Amarilla by Frederic Leighton

Amarilla

Amarilla by British Painter Frederic Leighton (1830 – 1896); was a painter and a sculptor, who was part of the Academic, Neoclassic and British Aesthetic Movements; as well as a politician.

This is a beautiful portrait of a young alluring brunette girl with a sad look on her face posing by a stone wall that overlooks the ocean and a shoreline of green foliage.

Directly behind her are two large trees with brown leaves and some red leaves, that indicate the fall season has arrived; and just off to her right we can see small sailboat coming towards the shore.

She has wrapped around her head a white kerchief with a black line pattern along its edge, a white blouse, a full length red dress, a black velour vest jacket; and is holding a handkerchief in her left hand, with her right hand resting on the ledge of the stone wall.

This is a remastered digital art old masters reproduction of a public domain image that is available as a canvas print online.

Info Below From Wikipedia.org

Leighton was born in Scarborough to Augusta Susan and Dr. Frederic Septimus Leighton. He had two sisters including Alexandra who was Robert Browning’s biographer.[2] He was educated at University College School, London.

He then received his artistic training on the European continent, first from Eduard von Steinle and then from Giovanni Costa. At age 17, in the summer of 1847, he met the philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer in Frankfurt and drew his portrait, in graphite and gouache on paper – the only known full-length study of Schopenhauer done from life.

When he was 24 he was in Florence; he studied at the Accademia di Belle Arti, and painted the procession of the Cimabue Madonna through the Borgo Allegri. From 1855 to 1859 he lived in Paris, where he met Ingres, Delacroix, Corot and Millet.

In 1860, he moved to London, where he associated with the Pre-Raphaelites. He designed Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s tomb for Robert Browning in the English Cemetery, Florence in 1861. In 1864 he became an associate of the Royal Academy and in 1878 he became its President (1878–96).

His 1877 sculpture, Athlete Wrestling with a Python, was considered at its time to inaugurate a renaissance in contemporary British sculpture, referred to as the New Sculpture. American art critic Earl Shinn claimed at the time that “Except Leighton, there is scarce any one capable of putting up a correct frescoed figure in the archway of the Kensington Museum”. His paintings represented Britain at the great 1900 Paris Exhibition.

Leighton was knighted at Windsor in 1878, and was created a baronet, of Holland Park Road in the Parish of St Mary Abbots, Kensington, in the County of Middlesex, eight years later. He was the first painter to be given a peerage, in the 1896 New Year Honours.

The patent creating him Baron Leighton, of Stretton in the County of Shropshire, was issued on 24 January 1896; Leighton died the next day of angina pectoris.

On his death his barony was extinguished after existing for only a day; this is a record in the Peerage. His house in Holland Park, London has been turned into a museum, the Leighton House Museum.

It contains many of his drawings and paintings, as well as some of his former art collection including works by Old Masters and his contemporaries such as a painting dedicated to Leighton by Sir John Everett Millais.

The house also features many of Leighton’s inspirations, including his collection of Iznik tiles. Its centerpiece is the magnificent Arab Hall. The Hall is featured in issue ten of Cornucopia. A blue plaque commemorates Leighton at Leighton House Museum.

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