Ceres, An Allegory of Summer by Antoine Watteau Classical Art Prints
Ceres, An Allegory of Summer by Antoine Watteau Classical Art Prints

Ceres, An Allegory of Summer

Ceres An Allegory of Summer c1717-18 by French Painter Jean-Antoine Watteau (1684 – 1721); is credited for reviving the Baroque style and moving it to a less intense Classical Rococo Style.

Ceres is an allegorical oil painting representing the Roman Goddess of the harvest, surrounded by the summer signs of the Zodiac Gemini, Cancer and Leo.

This is one of four paintings (and the only surviving one), that Watteau painted in the mythological style for the home of Pierre Crozat.

It features an alluring young woman as Ceres sitting on a throne of clouds with a sickle in her left hand, as she leans against the back of a Lion the symbol for Leo; that has below it a Lobster that represents the symbol Cancer and by the left hand of Ceres to young girls that represent the symbol Gemini, that are collecting the wheat harvest of the fields.

Behind them and all around these characters are billowing clouds of white, yellow, orange, blue, and brown, set against a blue sky.

This digital art creation, as with all the artwork that can be found on the Xzendor7 website is available for purchase online in a variety of material formats including canvas prints, acrylic prints, metal prints, wood prints, framed prints, posters, and as rolled canvas prints in a variety of sizes from 12 inches to 72 inches depending on the size of the actual artwork and the print on demand shop you choose to buy the art from.

About The Artist

Jean-Antoine Watteau was born in 1684 in Valenciennes, France, to Jean-Philippe Watteau a tiler, and Françoise Watteau, a seamstress.

At the age of seventeen, he began his artistic training with the painter Jacques-Albert Gérin (1632 – 1702); he later spent some time in Italy, studying the works of the great Italian painters and studying the Venetian Baroque style.

Watteau is best known for his Rococo paintings, which are characterized by their use of light color, movement, and graceful lines, and for their depictions of courtly life and theatrical scenes; as well as being known for his fêtes galantes, which were small, festive scenes of aristocrats at leisure.

+1
0
+1
1
+1
0
+1
0
+1
0
+1
0
0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments