Consuelo Vanderbilt by Giovanni Boldini
Consuelo Vanderbilt by Giovanni Boldini

Consuelo Vanderbilt

Consuelo Vanderbilt c1906 by Italian Painter Giovanni Boldini (1842 – 1931); an Italian genre and portrait painter who was known as the Master of Swish, due to the flowing brush strokes of his painting style.

This is an early 20th century portrait of Consuelo Vanderbilt (1876 -1964), Duchess of Marlborough, and Her Son, Lord Ivor Spencer-Churchill (1898 – 1956).

They are in what appears to be a small room, with Consuelo sitting on the edge of a decorative love seat, while her son has his right leg resting on a matching armchair, his left leg positioned on the floor and him leaning on his mothers lap with his head resting against her chest.

She has her black hair bundled up high, and she is wearing a silver sating choker around her neck, a black off shoulder satin evening dress with golden shoulder accents and blue-white floral embroidery on the wide deep v-neck of the dress.

Her son is wearing a brown suit with pants that go just below the knee, black socks and black shoes, along with a white shirt and black tie.

This is a remastered digital art old masters reproduction of a public domain image that is available as a canvas print online.

Info Below Derived From Wikipedia.org

Boldini was born in Ferrara, Italy on December 31, 1842, to the son of a painter of religious subject matter. In 1862 at the age of 20, he went to Florence for six years to study and pursue painting.

He only infrequently attended classes at the Academy of Fine Arts, but in Florence, met other realist painters known as the Macchiaioli, who were Italian precursors to Impressionism.

Their influence is seen in Boldini’s landscapes which show his spontaneous response to nature, although it is for his portraits that he became best known

Moving to London, Boldini attained success as a portraitist. He completed portraits of premier members of society including Lady Holland and the Duchess of Westminster.

In 1872 he moved to Paris, where he met and became friends with Edgar Degas. During the late 19th century he became the most fashionable portrait painter in Paris, with a dashing style of painting that highlights some of the Macchiaioli influence and a brio reminiscent of the work of younger artists, such as John Singer Sargent and Paul Helleu.

In 1889, he was nominated commissioner of the Italian section of the Paris Exposition, and received the Légion d’honneur for this appointment. In 1897 he had a solo exhibition in New York City; and he also participated in the Venice Biennale in 1895, 1903, 1905, and 1912.

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