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Departure For The Hunt In The Pontine Marshes by Horace Vernet
Departure For The Hunt In The Pontine Marshes by Horace Vernet

Departure For The Hunt In The Pontine Marshes

Departure for the Hunt in the Pontine Marshes c1833 by French Painter Horace Vernet (1789 – 1863); known for his Portraits, Orientalist and Battlefield scenes.

This is an impressive forest landscape scene of hunters traversing a forest that is just of a coast that we can see in the background to the right.

There are four men and a boy, three of the men are riding on donkeys or mules and the boy is riding on a mule that is packing supplies that is being led by the last man that is walking.

There is also a last mule and dog walking in the lead, and off to the left in the scene are two other dogs that are near a bank of a pond, with one dog drinking from the pond.

In the forest there is a fallen up rooted tree that has fallen across the pond and that has almost all of it’s bark removed; with other dead still standing trees in the foreground in and near the pond.

In the background we can see the lush forest with the lighting illuminating the dead tree at the center of the image.

Departure for the Hunt in the Pontine Marshes is a retouched digital art old masters reproduction of a public domain image that is available for purchase as acrylic, metal, rolled and canvas prints online.

Info Below Derived From NGA.gov and Wikipedia.org

Horace came from a long line of artist; he was born to French Painter Carle Vernet (Antoine Charles Horace Vernet 1758 – 1836), who was the youngest child of French Painter Claude-Joseph Vernet (1714 – 1789); France’s foremost painter of land- and seascapes.

On his mothers side of the family he was the grandson of the French engraver Jean Moreau le Jeune (1741 – 1814); and he was casually trained by his father, who was a chronicler of the elegancies of the post-Revolutionary decades and the empire.

Horace was a child prodigy and in his teens was considered a professional artist; and in 1811 opened his own studio producing artwork in fashion design, caricatures, portraits, horses in the manner of his father, and landscapes in the manner of his grandfather.

From 1821 to 1826 he painted a series of revolutionary and Napoleonic wars battles scenes Jemmapes, Montmirail, Hanau, and Valmy, painted for the duc d’Orléans, which gave a foretaste of that type of artwork he would later specialize in.

Though he had a disdain for the Bourbon government that was in power at the time and flaunted his distaste of it; he discretely mad conciliatory gestures to the government that were received well by the government and in short order, he was made an officer of the Legion of Honor in 1825, a member of the Institute in 1826; and after successful showings at the Salons of 1826 and 1827, was appointed director of the French Academy in Rome 1829.

He held this position for seven years and during this time produced “The Brigand’s Confession”, oriental subjects “The Arab Story-teller”, and historical anecdotes “Encounter of Raphael and Michelangelo in the Vatican”.

Then during the revolution of July 1830 which placed his patron Louis-Philippe on the throne; he was able to receive a vast number of opportunities of official state commissions for battle pieces; Four very large canvases for the Galerie des Batailles at Versailles, shown at the Salon of 1836, were followed by a second series in 1841.

Horace approach to creating his battle scene artwork was of that of a reporter of an eyewitness account at the actual theaters of war; so in five long visits to North Africa in 1833, 1837, 1839-40, 1845 and 1853 he gathered on the spot documentation of the French conquest on Algiers and Marocco, that he would later turn in to wall sized convases destined for Versailles.

In 1855 Horace exhibited twenty four paintings at the Universal Exposition, which his popular and official success.

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