Lady Orr-Lewis, née Maude Helen Mary Booth by Philip Alexius de László
Lady Orr-Lewis, née Maude Helen Mary Booth by Philip Alexius de László

Lady Orr-Lewis, née Maude Helen Mary Booth

Lady Orr-Lewis, née Maude Helen Mary Booth (1869 – 1937) c1917 by Hungarian Painter Philip Alexius de László (1869 – 1937); known for his portraits of aristocrats and royalty

This is an elegant portrait of Lady Orr-Lewis At the age of 48; the wife of Canadian businessman Sir Frederick Orr-Lewis, 1st Baronet (1860 – 1921); who was instrumental in creating Canadian Vickers Limited, an aircraft and shipbuilding company that operated in Canada.

She is sitting in a wicker chair wearing gold earrings, a diamond wedding ring,a string pearl necklace a full length black dress that has a side brooch by the side of her left waist and a gold toned with orange accents sheer shawl.

The portrait is set against a plain wall with a heavy curtain by a window on her right blocking out most of the sunlight, giving the curtain and orange glow appearance.

This is a remastered digital art old masters reproduction of a public domain image that is available as a canvas print online.

Info Below Derived From Wikipedia.org

László was born in humble circumstances in Budapest as Fülöp Laub, the eldest son of Adolf and Johanna Laub, a tailor and seamstress of Jewish origin. Fülöp and his younger brother Marczi changed their surname to László in 1891.

At an early age, Philip was apprenticed to a photographer while studying art, and eventually earned a placement at the National Academy of Art, where he studied under Bertalan Székely and Károly Lotz; and would later continue his studies in Munich and Paris.

In 1900 László visited the Vatican and met with the aging Pope Leo XIII and during that year painted a portrait of Pope Leo XIII which was exhibited at the Paris International Exhibition, earning him a Grand Gold Medal.

In 1903, László moved from Budapest to Vienna; then in 1907, he moved to England and remained in London for the remainder of his life; although traveling extensively throughout the world to fulfill commissions.

In 1909, László was invested MVO by Edward VII, and in 1912, he was ennobled by King Franz Joseph of Hungary; his surname then became “László de Lombos”, but he soon was using the name “de László”.

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