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Miguel de Cervantes Don Quixote by Gustave Doré
Miguel de Cervantes Don Quixote by Gustave Doré

Miguel de Cervantes – Don Quixote

Miguel de Cervantes – Don Quixote c1863 by French Artist Gustave Doré (Paul Gustave Louis Christophe Doré 1832 – 1883) who was a printmaker, illustrator, comics artist, caricaturist, and sculptor working primarily on wood engravings.

An interesting and extremely complex engraving showing Don Quixote with a sword in his right hand sitting in a large chair amidst disorderly characters of his notions from a book to the left of him, to his right and also above him.

In this awesome looking engraving we can see princesses and maidens, dragons, knights on horseback, even knights riding mice in a joust.

Miguel de Cervantes – Don Quixote is a retouched digital art reproduction of a public domain image that is available for purchase as an acrylic, metal and rolled canvas print online.

Info Below From Wikipedia.org

Doré was born in Strasbourg, France and by the age of 5 was a child prodigy artist; creating drawings that were mature beyond his years. Then at the age of 12, he began carving in stone, and by 15, began his career working as a caricaturist for the French paper Le journal pour rire.

In the beginning wood engraving was his primary method of artistic expression during the late 1840s and early 1850s, making several text comics, like Les Travaux d’Hercule (1847), Trois artistes incompris et mécontents (1851), Les Dés-agréments d’un voyage d’agrément (1851) and L’Histoire de la Sainte Russie (1854).

Doré subsequently went on to win commissions to depict scenes from books by Cervantes, Rabelais, Balzac, Milton, and Dante. He also illustrated “Gargantua et Pantagruel” in 1854; when he was just 22 years old.

In 1853 Doré was asked to illustrate the works of Lord Byron; and this commission led to additional work for British publishers, including a new illustrated Bible, and three years later he would produced 12 folio-size illustrations of The Legend of The Wandering Jew, which propagated longstanding antisemitic views of the time, for a short poem which Pierre-Jean de Béranger had derived from a novel of Eugène Sue of 1845.

During the 1860s Doré illustrated a French edition of Cervantes’s Don Quixote, and his depictions of the knight and his squire, Sancho Panza, have become so famous that they have influenced subsequent readers, artists, and stage and film directors’ ideas of the physical “look” of the two characters.

He also illustrated an oversized edition of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven”, an endeavor that earned him 30,000 francs from the publisher Harper & Brothers in 1883.

His illustrations for the Bible (1866) were highly successful, and in 1867 Doré had a major exhibition of his work in London, that led to the foundation of the Doré Gallery in Bond Street, London. In 1869, Blanchard Jerrold, the son of Douglas William Jerrold, suggested that they work together to produce a comprehensive portrait of London.

Jerrold had obtained the idea from The Microcosm of London produced by Rudolph Ackermann, William Pyne, and Thomas Rowlandson (published in three volumes from 1808 to 1810). Doré signed a five-year contract with the publishers Grant & Co that involved his staying in London for three months a year, and he received the vast sum of £10,000 a year for the project.

Though Doré was mainly celebrated for his paintings during his time, and though they remain world-renowned even till this day, it is his woodcuts and engravings, like those he did for Jerrold, that demonstrated is exceptional artistic talent as an artist with an individual vision.

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