Reoccupation Of Buda Castle In 1686 by Gyula Benczúr
Reoccupation Of Buda Castle In 1686 by Gyula Benczúr

Reoccupation Of Buda Castle In 1686

Reoccupation Of Buda Castle In 1686 c1896 by Hungarian Painter Gyula Benczúr (1844 – 1920), who specialized in portraits and historical scenes.

This is an interpretation of the reoccupation of Buda Castle (the palace complex of the Hungarian Kings in Budapest) in 1686 by Christian Military Forces; with Charles V Duke of Lorraine (1643 – 1690) (on horseback on the left) and Eugène Prince of Savoy (1663 – 1736) (on horseback on the right); field marshal in the army of the Holy Roman Empire and of the Austrian Habsburg Dynasty.

With the Christian troops taking prisoners of war there are countless war dead lying about the grounds and the victors chanting out their victory with voice and horn.

This is a retouched digital art old masters reproduction of a public domain image.

Info Below From Wikipedia.org

Gyula’s family moved to Kassa when he was still very young and he displayed an early talent for drawing. He began his studies in 1861 with Hermann Anschutz and Johann Georg Hiltensperger (1806–1890). From 1865 to 1869, he studied with Karl von Piloty.

He achieved international success in 1870 when he won the Hungarian national competition for historical painting with his depiction of King Stephen’s baptism. He then assisted Piloty with the frescoes at the Maximilianeum and the Rathaus in Munich and illustrated books by the great German writer, Friedrich Schiller. King Ludwig II of Bavaria gave him several commissions.

He was named a Professor at the Academy of Fine Arts, Munich, in 1875. Soon after, he built a home in Ambach on Lake Starnberg; designed by his brother Béla. In 1883, he returned to Hungary, where he continued to be an art teacher. One of his most distinguished pupils was the Swiss-born American painter Adolfo Müller-Ury. Benczúr was later a favorite among the Hungarian upper-class, painting numerous portraits of kings and aristocrats. He also created some religious works; notably altarpieces for St. Stephen’s Basilica and Buda Castle.

He was an honorary member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Streets have been named after him in Balassagyarmat, Balatonkenese, Berettyóújfalu, Bonyhád, Budapest, Debrecen, Jászberény, Komló, Pécs, Szabadszállás, Szeged and Košice. His daughters Olga (1875–1962) and Ida (1876–1970) also became well-known artists.

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