She'll String Along With You by Enoch Bolles
She’ll String Along With You by Enoch Bolles

She’ll String Along With You

She’ll String Along With You by American Painter Enoch Bolles (1883 – 1976); known as a glamour style pin-up art illustrator.

A beautiful young golden haired blonde is sitting on a red floor cushion, while wearing a teal blue bikini that has a bra section that is composed of what look like sea shells; a bracelet and a matching pair of high heel teal blue shoes.

She is patiently string together a large amount of blue beads using a needle and string; and just below her left elbow is the caption of the title of the piece.

This is a remastered digital art old masters reproduction of a public domain image that is available as a canvas print online.

Info Below Derived From Wikipedia.org

Enoch was born to perfume chemist Enoch Bolles, Jr and Catherine Keep in Marion County, Florida on March 3, 1883.

He studied at the New York National Academy of Design (est. 1825), and published his first illustration on the covers of humor magazines; Judge and Puck in 1914; becoming best known for illustrating the pulp magazine Film Fun.

Then in 1923 he became the exclusive cover artist for Film Magazine and would continue in that position until 1943, when the magazine became a victim of the then Postmaster General’s campaign against salacious material.

During Enoch’s time with Film Fun Magazine he created 200 pieces cover art, and at least 300 additional covers for other spicy pulp magazines, including Breezy Stories, Pep and New York Nights.

Enoch’s monthly lineup of the All-American Beauty precisely posed in imaginative costume is responsible for defining the art of American Pin Up Illustration. He was also a versatile illustrator that created advertising art for many products of the time such as Sun-Maid Raisins and Zippo Lighters.

At the age of 60, in 1943 Enoch had to end is professional career due to psychological problems, and was confined him to Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in New Jersey for most of the rest of his life; but he continued to paint commissioned portraits and for personal enjoyment.

He was eventually released from the Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in 1969 and he passed away seven years later of heart failure at the age of 93.

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