Still Life In The Atelier by Ferdinand von Wright
Still Life In The Atelier by Ferdinand von Wright

Still Life In The Atelier

Still Life In The Atelier c1868 by Finnish Painter Ferdinand von Wright (1822 – 1906); a landscape and animal painter of the 19th century

This is a beautiful richly colored still life painting of an artists studio that focuses just on a rich dark brown highly shellacked wooden desk with an ornately carved draw.

On the desk is a beautiful table oil lamp with copper base, brass top and porcelain dome made in the Victorian style; which forms the centerpiece of the scene; with great detail of the decorative features in the metal, oil in the glass reservoir with the included ribbon wick.

To the right is a black beer bottle and beside the bottle a short glass filled with freshly poured beer and beside that is a Nargile smoking pipe with with what may be a tobacco bag beside it.

To the left of the scene is a painters wooden palette that includes a metal cup on the lower portion, and that has dabs of white, yellow, red, green, blue and black paint around the outer perimeter with paint brushes sticking out of the hole that the artist places his thumb.

This is resting on an open artist storage supply box, that has more brushes underneath the palette as well as tubes of paint and other items; and on the inside lid of the box is a photograph of a similar oil lamp used as a reference for the scene.

Still Life In The Atelier is a remastered digital art old masters reproduction of a public domain image that is available as a canvas print online.

Information Below Derived From Wikipedia.org

Ferdinand was the last of nine surviving children to the retired Finnish Major Henrik Magnus von Wright; his two older brothers Magnus von Wright (1805 – 1868) and Wilhelm von Wright (1810 – 1887) were painters and illustrators and he followed in their footsteps, showing an early aptitude for art, which was developed during the time he spent hunting and exploring nature, recording what he had observed in his sketchbooks.

In 1837 he left Finland and traveled to Sweden with his second eldest brother Wilhelm; whom at the time was working as an illustrator for the Swedish Zoologist Bengt Fredrik Fries (1799 – 1839); then in 1838 he went back to Sweden to work for the Swedish amatuer Ornithologist Count Nils Bonde (1685 – 1760).

After going back to Finland on completion of his work; he then returned to Sweden in 1842 and briefly attended the Royal Swedish Academy of Arts studying under the Swedish sculptor Johan Niclas Byström (1783 – 1848); then two years later returned home to Finland.

Then in 1849 he traveled to Turku, Finland where he took additional painting lessons from Swedish Romantic Painter Robert Wilhelm Ekman (1808 – 1873); following his studies, he and his brothers went to Helsinki, the capital of Finland and set up a studio; and six years later he traveled to Dresden, Germany to study under the noted German animal painter Johann Siegwald Dahl (1827 – 1902).

During the 1870s he suffered several strokes that kept him bedridden; but he continued to paint, and in 1881 made his last trip to Orust to visit his brother Wilhelm who was also sick.

From this point on his work became more commercial, and in 1886 he produced his best known painting “The Fighting Capercailles” and was contributing articles to various ornithological publication.

About this time he received a state artists pension; and during the 1890s many of his former students came to visit, while in the late 90s bird painter Matti Karppanen (1873 – 1953) stayed on to be his pupil and assistant.

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