Thanksgiving at Plymouth by Jennie Augusta Brownscombe
Thanksgiving at Plymouth by Jennie Augusta Brownscombe

Thanksgiving at Plymouth

Thanksgiving at Plymouth c1925 by American Painter Jennie Augusta Brownscombe (1850 – 1936); designer, etcher, illustrator and commercial artist.

This is recreation of her earlier 1914 painting; the First Thanksgiving at Plymouth, that omits the headdresses of the plains Indians that were criticized as non-historically accurate in her 1914 original version.

It shows the gathering of the pilgrims sitting by a large table with filled with food and the Indians on the far left sitting on the and in the background is the coast with a sailboat, white birds flying and in the foreground a mother tending a baby in a cradle with other children looking on.

Thanksgiving at Plymouth is a retouched digital art old masters reproduction of a public domain image that is available as a rolled print online.

Info Below Derived From Wikipedia.org

Jennie was the only child of William Brownscombe a farmer from Devonshire, England and American Elvira Kennedy Brownscombe. Her father is believed to have immigrated to the United States about 1840 and built the home she was born and raised in.

Her mother, Elvira Kennedy Brownscombe, was a descendant of a Mayflower passenger and Isaac Stearns who arrived in the colonies in 1630. During her life, Jennie was an active member of the Daughters of the American Revolution; the Mayflower Descendants and the Historic and Scenic Preservation Society.

Jennie’s mother, was a talented writer and artist in her own right, and fostered her daughter’s interest in poetry and art. As a high school student Jennie won awards at the Wayne County Fair for her artwork.

After her father’s death in 1868, Jennie earned a living teaching high school in Honesdale and by creating book and magazine illustrations, which she drew inspiration from the streams and fields around her home and nearby Irving Cliff.

Jennie was among a group of artists of the Colonial Revival Movement, that admired colonial heroes like George Washington and colonial history, inspired by the 1876 centennial.

Other artists included Howard Pyle, Jean Leon Gerome Ferris, Henry Alexander Ogden, Edward Percy Moran and John Ward Dunsmore.

Their works, inspired by earlier artwork and George Washington biographies, were publicized in color in books, magazines, calendars and other commercial products, utilizing contemporary advances in lithographic printing.

Between 1895 and 1897 she made The Peace Ball which depicted Washington introducing his mother to Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette and Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau.

She painted scenes of Dolley Madison hosting a ball, the Liberty Bell being rung by a man, and Betsy Ross sewing the American flag.

In 1914 she painted The First Thanksgiving which depicts the historic event when colonialists and Native Americans, led by Massasoit, gathered in 1621 to celebrate the bounty of their first harvest in accordance with an English tradition.

That 1914 Thanksgiving painting has a few historical inaccuracies; they include the Native Americans being dressed as Plains Indians and the presence of the log cabin.

Pointedly, the anachronistic Plains Indians headdresses depicted in her 1914 painting were not repeated when Brownscombe recreated the First Thanksgiving scene in her 1925 painting Thanksgiving at Plymouth.

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